Global Modeling Initiative

The Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) is part of the NASA Modeling Analysis and Prediction (MAP) program. GMI investigations support the development and integration of a state-of-the-art modular 3-D chemistry and transport model (CTM) that includes full chemistry for both the troposphere and stratosphere. The GMI model is involved in assessment of anthropogenic impacts, such as those from aircraft, future changes in atmospheric composition, and the role of long-range transport of pollution.

The GMI model serves as a testbed for different meteorological fields, emissions, microphysical mechanisms, chemical mechanisms, deposition schemes, and other processes determining atmospheric composition, both gas-phase and aerosol. This enables GMI to work in close collaboration with the chemistry-climatemodeling community. GMI seeks to understand and constrain the uncertainties in model results through intercomparison of simulations and through comparison with observations.

The GMI model is compliant with the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), thus facilitating incorporation of new model components.  The model has been integrated with meteorological fields from free-running GCMs and from the GEOS-4 Data Assimilation System (DAS). Recent simulations with GEOS-4-DAS include the AURA period (2004-present); output is available to the scientific community for analysis. 

    What's New

  • A list of the prioritized GMI action items based on the discussion at the September 2010 GMI Science Team Meeting is now available.
  • The presentations from the GMI Science Team Meeting held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on September 9-10, 2010 are now available.

Ozone Impacts on Health

<p>Ozone created in Europe regularly pollutes the Mediterranean Sea Basin, northern Africa and the Near East, impacting human health especially in summer. This figure shows the number of avoided premature mortalities per million people per year in the population of each grid cell that would result from a 100% reduction of European pollution. Black boxes represent regions with increased premature mortalities.  This work was done by Bryan Duncan, Jason West, Yasuko Yoshida, Arlene Fiore, and Jerry Ziemke. It is currently under review in Atmos. Chem. Phys. Disc., 2007.

Ozone created in Europe regularly pollutes the Mediterranean Sea Basin, northern Africa and the Near East, impacting human health especially in summer. This figure shows the number of avoided premature mortalities per million people per year in the population of each grid cell that would result from a 100% reduction of European pollution. Black boxes represent regions with increased premature mortalities. This work was done by Bryan Duncan, Jason West, Yasuko Yoshida, Arlene Fiore, and Jerry Ziemke. It is currently under review in Atmos. Chem. Phys. Disc., 2007.